Interpreting is a linguistic process that involves a speaker who is fluent in two languages acting as the intermediary between two (or more) people who speak only one of the languages.

What you sometimes see or hear during a news broadcast is interpreting (usually at the government level), but the people providing this service are often mistakenly called translators. Simply put, interpreting is oral, whereas translation involves the written word. While some interpreters also provide translation services, that is a different process and skill altogether.

There are two types of interpreting - simultaneous and consecutive. [For a description of the difference, keep scrolling.] Consecutive interpreting takes longer than simultaneous, but it usually results in greater accuracy and completeness. 

Interpreting takes a tremendous amount of concentration, and interpreters need breaks every half hour or so. Professional interpreters often specialize in a particular field – medicine, law, engineering, etc. – each of which has its own terminology and jargon, so don’t expect the same interpreter to be comfortable or highly skilled in all topics.

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Our Services

RussTech provides interpreters for bi-lateral meetings and multiple language conferences. Our interpreters are experienced professionals with a high level of language skills in both the source and target language.

Simultaneous Vs. Consecutive

  • Simultaneous Interpreting

    • The interpreter interprets at the same time the speaker is speaking, usually staying less than a sentence behind.

    • Typically, the interpreter sits in a soundproof booth, listening to the speaker through earphones and talking to the audience through a microphone.

    • In diplomatic meetings the interpreter may sit next to a single person, speaking softly in the target language (this is often called “whisper” interpreting).

  • Consecutive Interpreting

    • The speaker completes a sentence or two (not more), then waits as the interpreter repeats the message in a different language.

    • In group meetings, the interpreter stands next to the speaker, and each takes turns talking to the audience; equipment is seldom used.

    • Consecutive interpreting often takes place in face-to-face meetings among individuals with all participants seated. 

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